Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 133,169 pages of information and 210,845 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Hurst, Nelson and Co

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Name Plate. Exhibit at Galley Museum, Queenstown.
1900.
1901. Built for the Hull Corporation. Exhibit at Beamish Museum.
January 1902.
December 1906.
1908.
1911.
1914.
1921.
1921.
1921.
1921.
1929. Glasgow 1115. Exhibit at Crich Tramway Museum.
1946. Hopper Wagon built for the London and North Eastern Railway. Exhibit at the Shildon Locomotion Museum.
Exhibit at the Didcot Railway Centre.

Hurst, Nelson and Co of the Glasgow Rolling Stock and Plant, Motherwell; 14 Leadenhall Street, London EC; and at Chatsworth Wagon Works, nr Chesterfield, and at Swansea Wagon Works, Swansea.

1880 Company established by Andrew Schlanders Nelson

1893 Company registered

1900 June. Tramways and Light Railways Exhibition at Islington. Showed two tramcars on the BTH exhibit. [1]

1901 Railway Carriage Builders, Rolling Stock and Railway Plant Contractors. [2]

1909 Incorporated as a limited company to acquire a company of the same name registered in 1893.

1911 Manufacturer of Carriages and Wagons; Light Railway Engineers and Contractors for the Railways.[3]

1914 Directory: Listed as Railway Plant manufacturers. [4]

1914 Railway and tramway rolling stock manufacturers. Specialities: railway carriages, wagons, electric cars and every other description of railway and tramway rolling stock, motor omnibus and other road vehicles bodies, electric railway and tramway trucks,wheels, axles, railway plant, forgings, smithwork, iron and brass castings, pressed steelwork of all kinds including underframes and bogies. Employees 1,600. [5]

1918 Wagon Repairs founded to acquire the wagon-repairing business of various wagon-building firms including Hurst, Nelson and Co.

1924 They removed their London office from 14. Leadenhall-street, E. C. 3, to 32, Great St. Helens, Bishopsgate, E.C. 3.[6]

1926 Messrs Hurst Nelson's wagon works restarted in December.[7]

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. The Engineer of 29th June 1900 p667
  2. White's Directory of Sheffield and Rotherham, 1901 p979
  3. Bradshaw’s Railway Manual 1911
  4. Kelly's Directory of Durham, 1914 p765
  5. 1914 Whitakers Red Book
  6. The Engineer 1924/03/21
  7. The Engineer 1926/12/27