Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 135,180 pages of information and 215,290 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

J. Chadwick and Sons

From Graces Guide

Jump to: navigation, search
1860s engine by John Chadwick, at Manchester's Museum of Science and Industry
1891.
A-frame small vertical engine. Exhibit at Bolton Steam Museum.
Chadwick's Salford works was immediately to the left of this lock, and extended to the railway viaduct (Location: Junction of canal with the River Irwell, viewed from Prince's Bridge. Site now crossed by a new road).

John Chadwick and Co, initially of 25 Watson-street, Peter-street, Manchester, and subsequently Prince's Bridge Iron Works, Salford.

1866 Advertisement: 'VERTICAL and horizontal STEAM ENGINES, 20,15,12, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, and 2 horse power, constantly on stock, or in progress of making ; they are very strong, well made, and cheap. Steam Boilers of various powers, Safety Valves, Water Gauges, Steam Gauges, &c. .-JOHN CHADWICK, 25 Watson-street, Peter-street, Manchester.'[1]

1870 Advertisement: 'HORIZONTAL and Vertical STEAM ENGINES, horizontal, vertical, and diagonal, 2, 3, 4. 5, 6, 7. 8, 10, 14, 16. 20, 25, 30, 40, and 50 horses power, constantly in stock or progress of making, with ordinary slide valves, or with expansion valves, saving one-third to one-half the fuel; any of the above engines can be fitted with air pumps and condensers of improved principle.-JOHN CHADWICK, 25 Watson-street, Peter-street, Manchester.'[2]

1869 Vertical engine. 5 hp at 50 rpm. Exhibit at Manchester's Museum of Science and Industry

1874 Advertisement: 'STEAM ENGINES, horizontal, vertical, and diagonal, 2, 3, 4. 5, 6, 7. 8, 10, 14, 16. 20, 25, 30, 40, and 50 horses power, constantly in stock or progress of making, with ordinary slide valves, or with expansion valves, saving one-third to one-half the fuel; any of the above engines can be fitted with air pumps and condensers of improved principle.-JOHN CHADWICK, Prince's Bridge Iron Works, Prince’s Bridge. Water-street (late Junction Foundry, Watson-street).'[3]

1880s: Regularly advertising as makers of steam engines, boilers and machine tools [4]

1899: Evidently the firm had become Chadwick and Clarke: 'FITTER WANTED, first-class man, for engine work: also TWO first-class TOOL FITTERS.—Chadwick and Clarke, Prince's Bridge Ironworks, Salford. BORER WANTED for horizontal machine.—Chadwick and Clarke, Prince's Bridge Ironworks. Salford. [5]

1899 'FATAL FALL FROM A CRANE. About noon, to-day, James Pye, about 30 years of age, of Stone-street, Weaste, employed by Messrs. Chadwick and Clark, engineers, of Prince's Bridge, Salford, fell from a crane to the ground, a distance of some 20 feet. His head was badly damaged, and death took place before the Salford Royal Hospital was reached.'[6]

1900 Advertisement: 'APPRENTICES TO ENGINEERING—JOHN CHADWICK, SON, & CLARKE, engine builders, &c., Prince's Bridge Ironworks, Salford, are Open to take into their works a Couple of smart, well-educated Youths; premium required.'[7]

John Chadwick's Salford works was squeezed into a small wedge of land bounded by the Prince's Bridge approach road, the River Irwell, the Manchester, Bolton and Bury Canal, and a railway viaduct (see photo). The site is now mainly occupied by a ring road.

See Also

Loading...

Sources of Information

  1. Manchester Times, 19th May 1866
  2. Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser - Saturday 09 April 1870
  3. Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, 11th July 1874
  4. Advertisement in Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, 2nd August 1889
  5. Manchester Evening News, 4th April 1899
  6. Manchester Evening News, Wednesday 15th February 1899
  7. Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, 6th February 1900