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James Simpson, Junior

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James Simpson (1829-1889) of James Simpson and Co, civil engineer

1829 January 10th. Born the son of James Simpson, water works engineer

Married Mary (c.1841 - 1923[1])

1884 James Simpson civil engineer; 101 Grosvenor Rd, Pimlico, London SW; also at this address was Simpson and Co, engineers[2].

1889 May 11th. Died aged 60, at Palmeira Mansions, Brighton[3].


1889 Obituary [4]

JAMES SIMPSON, the eldest son of the late Mr. James Simpson, Past President of the Institution of Civil Engineers, was born on the 10th of January, 1829, at Thames Bank, Chelsea, the residence of his father, who was at that time Engineer to the Chelsea Waterworks Company.

He was educated at St. Peter’s Collegiate School, Eaton Square, and at Dr. Lord‘s private school at Tooting.

In 1846 he was articled to Messrs. Burns and Bryce, Architects, Edinburgh, when he lived with the late Mr. John Brown, M.D. Returning to London in 1851 he joined his father, who was at that time engaged in an extensive practice as a civil engineer, and superintended for him the execution of several important works, amongst others the construction of the water-works at Carlisle and the extension of the Chelsea Water-works Company to Surbiton, Surrey.

In 1857, he joined the firm of Simpson and Company, manufacturing engineers, taking a leading part in the introduction of improved pumping-plants, especially the Woolf Compound Pumping-Engines, and in the construction of water-works abroad. For the past few years failing health prevented close attention to business, although to the last he took a lively interest in all matters connected with engineering. He was much respected by those in his employ, as well as by others with whom he was associated, not only for his kindliness of disposition, but also for his readiness to impart knowledge.

His health gradually failing, he died at Brighton on the 11th of May, 1889, and was buried at Brompton Cemetery.

He was elected a Member of the Institution on the 6th of December, 1864.


1889 Obituary [5]

JAMES SIMPSON, the eldest son of the late Mr. James Simpson, Past-President of the Institution of Civil Engineers, was born on 10th January 1829 at Thames Bank, Chelsea, the residence of his father, who was at that time engineer to the Chelsea Water Works.

He was educated at St. Peter's Collegiate School, Eaton-Square, and at Dr. Lord's private school at Tooting.

In 1846 ho was articled to Messrs. Burns and Bryce, architects, Edinburgh.

Returning to London in 1851, he joined his father, who was at that time engaged in an extensive practice as a civil engineer, and superintended for him the erection of several important works, amongst others the construction of the water works at Carlisle, and the extension of the Chelsea Water Works to Surbiton, Surrey.

In 1857 be joined the firm of Messrs. Simpson and Co., engineers, Pimlico, where he took a leading part in the introduction of improved pumping machinery, especially the Woolf compound pumping engines, and also in the construction of water works abroad.

For the past few years failing health prevented his taking such an active part in the business, although to the last he retained a lively interest in all matters connected with engineering.

He died on 11th May 1889, at the age of sixty, and was buried at Brompton Cemetery.

He became a Member of this Institution in 1878.


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. The Times, 16 July 1923
  2. Business Directory of London, 1884
  3. The Times, 16 May 1889
  4. 1889 Institution of Civil Engineers: Obituaries
  5. 1889 Institution of Mechanical Engineers: Obituaries