Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 149,702 pages of information and 235,429 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Maudslay: Subsidy

From Graces Guide

Note: This is a sub-section of Maudslay Motor Co

WWI. Rising international tensions precipitated a major contract for the supply of 30cwt and 3-ton "subsidy" lorries to private buyers on terms set by the War Office. Taking the subsidy obliged the buyer to release the vehicle to the War Office in time of war

New terms and conditions were announced in 1911, applying to all vehicles built after January 1910. By this time the War office had determined the specification of qualifying lorries, with trials held to determine reliability and quality. Only approved lorries were accepted onto the scheme.

This new scheme was 'The Provisional Scheme for Subsidising Petrol Motor Lorries' and in keeping with its predecessors was complicated as only government can achieve.

The owner first enrolled their vehicle onto the scheme and then received the initial subsidy (subvention) payment. This comprised, £12 for a live axle lorry, £10 for a chain drive lorry if chains were enclosed or £8 if chains were exposed. An additional £10 was payable if the owner carried a spare magneto, ready for immediate fitting and waterproofed.

An annual subsidy of £15 was paid half-yearly, in arrears and subject to satisfactory War office inspection, to cover maintenance. Every vehicle had to be kept under cover and protected from frost. Only properly qualified drivers were to drive subsidised vehicles, although 'properly qualified' does not appear to have been quantified.

Purchase of each subsidised lorry was compulsory in time of 'national danger' or if proclamation was made under the Reserve Forces Act, 1882. The owner was required to deliver the lorry in full working order, with spares to any depot in the country nominated by the War Office within three days.

Purchase price was calculated on depreciation of 7.5% per half year, plus 25% up to initial price, though not less than 30% of initial cost.

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