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Sidney Clarence Bunn

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Sidney Clarence Bunn (1900-1950)


1951 Obituary [1]

"SIDNEY CLARENCE BUNN had considerable experience as an electrical engineer and at the time of his death, which occurred on 5th November 1950, was holding the appointment of assistant electrical engineer in charge of the Lots Road generating station of the London Passenger Transport Board at Chelsea. He was born in 1900 and served his apprenticeship with Messrs. Lester Perkins, Ltd., Royal Albert Docks, and Messrs. John Brown, Ltd., between 1914 and 1921. In the meanwhile he studied at the East London College, of Engineering and the West Ham Polytechnic, obtaining the diploma in mechanical engineering and fuel technology. He was then at sea for two years as marine engineer in vessels of the Glen Line, being in charge of watch, and rising from sixth to third engineer. After a short engagement as erector to Messrs. Babcock and Wilcox, Ltd., he joined the New Zealand Shipping Company, Ltd., and remained in the firm's service until 1928. He obtained an extra first-class Board of Trade Certificate and rose from third to chief engineer. Further experience then followed with Messrs. Babcock and Wilcox, Ltd., as erector and tester before beginning, in 1930, his long connection with the Lots Road station. After acting as boiler house engineer for five years, he was appointed resident engineer, and finally in 1941 he became assistant electrical engineer in charge and officer of board. Mr. Bunn was elected an Associate Member of the Institution in 1941 and transferred to Membership in 1945. He was also an Associate Member of the Institution of Electrical Engineers."


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