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Arthur Thomas Walmisley

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Arthur Thomas Walmisley (1848-1923), Civil engineer.

son of Arthur Walmisley of the Foreign Office

1888 President for the Society of Engineers. [1]


1923 Obituary [2]

We have to announce with regret the death of Mr. Arthur Thomas Walmisley, which took place at Folkestone on the 18th inst.

Mr. Walmisley, who was the son of the late Mr. Arthur Walmisley, of the Foreign Office, was born in Westminster on April 27th, 1848.

He was educated first at King's College School, and subsequently at King's College, London, of which foundation he was afterwards elected a Fellow. He commenced his engineering career as articled pupil to the late Mr. R. M. Ordish, civil engineer, of Great George-street, Westminster. While with Mr. Ordish he assisted in the erection of the great span roof at St. Pancras railway station, considered in its day one of the most remarkable pieces of engineering work in the country.

Subsequently he became resident engineer for the Albert Bridge, Chelsea, and then, after being engaged upon some of the drawings for the reconstruction of the Alexandra Palace, Muswell Hill for which the late Mr. John Johnson was architect, he entered the Westminster firm of Messrs. Edwin Clark, Punchard and Co., being given a position in the drawing office. While so engaged he served directly under the late Mr. Edwin Clark, who was noted as having been resident engineer under Robert Stephenson on the Britannia and Conway tubular bridges, and who put Mr. Walmisley in charge of the drawing-office when the chief draughtsman went abroad. Later, Mr. Walmisley assisted Mr. Edwin Clark's brother, Mr. Latimer Clark, with designs for floating docks... More


1923 Obituary [3]

ARTHUR THOMAS WALMISLEY died on January 18, 1923.

He was born in London in April 1848, and was the son of the late Mr. A. Walmisley of the Foreign Office. He was educated first at King's College School, and subsequently at King's College, of which foundation he was afterwards elected a Fellow.

He commenced his engineering career as an articled pupil to the late Mr. R. M. Ordish, civil engineer, of Great George Street, Westminster. While with Mr. Ordish he assisted in the erection of the great span roof at St. Pancras railway station, considered in its day one of the most remarkable pieces of engineering work in the country.

Subsequently he became resident engineer for the Albert Bridge, Chelsea, and then, after being engaged upon some drawings for the reconstruction of the Alexandra Palace, Muswell Hill, he entered the firm of Messrs. Edwin Clark, Punchard and Co., being given a position in the drawing-office. While so engaged he served directly under the late Mr. Edwin Clark, who was noted as having been resident engineer under Robert Stephenson on the Britannia and Conway tubular bridges. Later he assisted with designs for floating docks.

In 1876, under the late Sir (then Mr.) A. R. Binnie, he was engaged upon the Bradford reservoirs and high-level water supply.

A year later he returned to London and started for himself as a civil engineer in private practice in Westminster.

He was until 1919 senior partner in the firm of A. T. Walmisley and White. Amongst notable works on which he was engaged while in private practice were the main roofs of Olympia, Kensington, the roof of the Carlisle Corporation Market, and the reconstruction of the Borough Market, London Bridge.

In 1888 he was appointed engineer to the Dover Harbour Board, and held that position until his death. Among the works which he had carried out was the widening of the Admiralty Pier. He was well known as an expert witness before Parliamentary Committees, and has rendered services as an arbitrator in many legal cases.

He was a member of the Institution of Civil Engineers, Past- President of the Civil and Mechanical Engineers' Society, Past-President of the Society of Engineers, Fellow of the Surveyors' Institution, Hon. Associate of the Royal Institute of British Architects, and member of the Geologists' Association. He was also the author of "Iron Roofs," "Field Works and Instruments," "Land Surveying and Levelling," and numerous articles and monographs on professional subjects in various publications.

He was elected a member of the Iron and Steel Institute in 1905 and became a life member shortly afterwards.


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. The Engineer 1889/02/08
  2. The Engineer 1923/01/26
  3. 1923 Iron and Steel Institute: Obituaries