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Charles Sneath Allott

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Charles Sneath Allott (1892-1907) of C. S. Allott and Son

1869 Birth of son Henry Newmarch Allott


1907 Obituary [1]

CHARLES SNEATH ALLOTT died suddenly of heart-failure at Manchester on the 27th February, 1907.

Born at Lincoln on the 17th May, 1842, he was the son of the late Mr. Joseph Allott, maltster, of Lincoln and Newark-upon-Trent.

After serving a pupilage under Mr. L. H. Moorsom, on the Ringwood and Christchurch Railway, he joined the staff of the Fairbairn Engineering Company in 1862 and remained in their service until the liquidation of the Company in 1875, at which time he occupied the position of assistant manager. During this period he had charge of many important works, including the roofs of the Albert Hall, and Liverpool Street Station, London, the framework of the Spithead forts, and the bridges of the Intercolonial Railway, Canada.

He commenced practice on his own account in 1875, and amongst other work, he was responsible for the construction of the iron bridges of the Cheshire Lines Committee between Manchester and Cornbrook. His services were requisitioned by the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Company to report on the whole of their iron underbridges, and he afterwards prepared drawings for the strengthening of a large number of these bridges and designed many new bridges for this and other railway-companies and public bodies, large cotton mills for Brazil and China and other important works.

In 1897 he took into partnership his son Mr. Henry Newmarch Allott and the practice was continued under the style of C. S. Allott and Son, since which time the firm have been responsible for many important works, including the buildings for housing the electrical plant at the new Stuart Street electricity generating-station of the Manchester Corporation and many bridges for the Salford Corporation and other public bodies.

Mr. Allott took a lively interest in church work and in voluntary schools. He was a prominent Freemason and served several offices in connection with the craft. He was also a keen golfer, and at the time of his death he was captain of the Manchester club.

He was of an exceptionally bright, genial and kindly disposition, and anyone needing advice and sympathy was sure to receive them at his hands. He was especially kindly to young engineers and was never happier than when trying to further the interests of deserving men.

Mr. Allott served on one of the Sectional Committees for the Engineering Conference in 1903, and also acted as President of the Manchester Association of Students of The Institution in 1897.

He was a Member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, the Liverpool Engineering Society, and the Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society.

He was elected an Associate of The Institution on the 4th April, 1876, was subsequently placed in the class of Associate Members, and was transferred to the class of Members on the 21st December, 1880. Charles Sneath Alliott (1842-1907)


1907 Obituary [2]

CHARLES SNEATH ALLOTT was born at Lincoln on 17th May 1842.

After serving a pupilage under Mr. L. H. Moorsom on the Ringwood and Christchurch Railway, he joined the staff of the Fairbairn Engineering Co., of Manchester, in 1862, and remained in their service until the liquidation of the company in 1875, at which time he occupied the position of assistant manager. During this period he had charge of the construction of many important works, including the roofs of the Albert Hall and the Liverpool Street Station, London, the framework of the Spithead Forts and the bridges of the Inter-Colonial Railway, Canada.

He commenced practice on his own account in 1875, and had charge of the construction of the iron bridges of the Cheshire Lines Committee between Manchester and Cornbrook.

His services were requisitioned by the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway to report on the whole of their iron under-bridges, and he afterwards prepared drawings for the strengthening of a large number of them.

He designed many new bridges for this and other railway companies and public bodies, large cotton mills for Brazil and China, and other important works.

In 1897 he took into partnership his son Henry N. Allott and the practice was continued under the name of C. S. Allott and Son, since which time the firm have been responsible for many important works, including the whole of the buildings for the new Stuart Street Electricity Generating Station of the Manchester Corporation, and many bridges for the Salford Corporation and other public bodies.

His death took place from heart failure at the Athenaeum in Manchester on 27th February 1907, in his sixty-fifth year.

He became a Member of this Institution in 1891; and was also a Member of the Institution of Civil Engineers, the Liverpool Engineering Society, and the Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society.


1907 Obituary [3]

. . . President of the Manchester Association of Students of the Institution of Civil Engineers in 1897 . . . He was head of the firm of C. S. Allott and Sons, engineers, of Manchester, . . . [more]


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