Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

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Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Edward Lisle: Brief Biography

From Graces Guide

Note: This is a sub-section of Edward Lisle


EDWARD LISLE Brief Biography.[1]

Once, on a holiday motor tour, noticed, on the day we approached one particular cathedral town, the owner of the car was strangely impatient; he would brook no delays, and, when in the town itself, we had to rummage with him into all the odd nooks and corners. it was his native town, and he was traversing the scenes of his boyhood. Before long, the third man and myself began a process of assimilation, and we eventually hunted just as eagerly for the old school, the football field, and the stream where they used to bathe and fish and fall in.

All these things came to my mind last week, when I was spending a few hours with the subject of this week's caricature at his place near Wolverhampton, for Mr. Edward Lisle was born in that town, and he lives now on the fringe of a common in that delightful old village close by called Tettenhall. Lisle conducted me, first of all on afoot, round the village to a point to where one has a wonderful view of distant Wolverhampton, and then into the quaint old churchyard to see what was absorbingly interesting to a Dickens' lover — the grave of Little Nell and her grandfather: Tettenhall was the end of their sad wanderings.

Next, we had an hour in a 12 h.p. four-cylinder Star. What points of interest he did crowd in, and the marvel of it to find so many and charming sylvan scenes within such few miles of the dismal "Black Country"! I again found myself ardently interested in boyhood scenes, and sharing Lisle's enthusiasm for the goodliness of his native heath. Later, we had a glimpse of the country he had hunted over, of a church whose clock and peal of, bells he had presented years ago.

Presently, we drew nearer town, and mounted a stiff rise on which they test their vans and cars — a nice little stretch of 1 in 7, with a twist at the top and a bit of 1 in 5 to finish up with. One can see little more than "the stars," when one is climbing it. Previous to the explorations named above, I had found much that was interesting in a comprehensive collection of pictures, in the palm houses and the vineries. It was noticeable that the stables, which formerly housed eight horses, now only served as shelter for motorcars; there was one pony for the young sons, as Lisle considers the exercise good for making the boys grow. Then I caught sight, in the grounds, of a chalet with open sides in which two of the sons sleep, they being open-air enthusiasts. A small tombstone caught my eye, denoting that "Turk the Terror" lay at peace beneath, and a question from me elicited the fact that this canine hero lived a dashing, intrepid, lawless life — if a somewhat brief one: he was a perfect bandolero. Poor Turk met an outlaw's death. He was condemned to be shot, and the village recommended them to get two guns ready, as they did not think one would accomplish it. What it is to have a great reputation!

Edward Lisle came along from small beginnings: he was in the employ of Bayliss, Jones and Bayliss, ironfounders, and he quickly discovered the possibilities of the cycle trade. He risked his savings in the manufacturing of cycles, and came near to admitting failure; in fact, he went to the Singer Cycle Company and asked for employment, but, as there was at the moment no opening, he plodded along as before, and the flowing tide at last turned in his favour, and he built up a great cycle business.

One of the first to take up motors, he has never looked back, and an idea will be gained of the extent of his business when I say that his weekly wages bill comes out at £1,000.

I don't know a man who is more sure of himself than Edward Lisle, and where instinct is truer as to the needs of the people who are likely to buy motors; that, doubtless, is why he has succeeded. Personally, he is a jovial soul, with a great sporting side to his character, for, if it is coursing you want, a day's motoring, or a day's shooting, he is your man, but I am not sure that he is not happiest at home, with plenty of lawn tennis, and some billiards to follow.

He is a member of Council of Motor Manufacturers and Traders, and is a leading spirit in the Wolverhampton Automobile Club. "Work hard, play hard, and pay your way" seems to be Lisle's motto. He has certainly done all three, and does them still.



See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Commercial Motor 11th February 1909 p467