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British Industrial History

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Edward Rush Turner

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Edward Rush Turner (1823-1904) of E. R. and F. Turner


1904 Obituary [1]

EDWARD RUSH TURNER, who died at his home, near Ipswich, on the 10th February, 1904, was one of the pioneer engineers who helped to build up the great trade in agricultural and milling machinery which this country enjoys.

Born in December, 1823, he was the son of Mr. Walton Turner, a leather merchant, and after serving a pupilage to the firm of Bond, Turner and Hurwood, he was sent to Wren and Bennett, of Manchester, to learn general engineering and mill-wrighting.

From 1847, in partnership with Mr. Hurwood, he carried on the business at St. Peter’s Works, Ipswich, and on the retirement of Mr. Hurwood in 1851, after conducting the business alone for a time, he ultimately took into partnership his brother, Frederick Turner, and established the firm which now enjoys a wide reputation.

The company was successful practically from the first, and the works were rapidly developed. The subject of this notice took great interest in mills of all kinds for the crushing of cereals, and was an active competitor in the trials of the Royal and Smithfield shows. The manufacture of all kinds of implements was also undertaken.

In traction-engine work also Mr. E. R. Turner interested himself, and he is credited with the invention or introduction of the extension of the fore part of the boiler, so arranged that the fore-carriage might swing through a large arc.

While actively engaged in this work Mr. Turner found time to devote to municipal matters, and it is largely to his efforts that the present extensive sewer system of Ipswich is due.

On the death, in 1864, of Mr. Hurwood, who had held the office of Engineer to the Dock Commission from the time of the construction of the dock, Mr. Turner was appointed hi8 successor, and his relinquishment of the post after seven years’ service was due solely to the increasing claims of private business. He served the office of Mayor in 1882.

Mr. Turner was elected an Associate of the Institution on the 5th December, 1865, was subsequently placed among the Associate Members, and was transferred to the class of Members on the 1st April, 1879. Not long before his death he was enrolled as an Honorary Life Subscriber.


Obituary 1904[2]

"...Wednesday , 10th inst., at his home near Ipswich, removes one of those pioneer engineers who helped to build up the great trade in agricultural machinery which this country enjoys. He was the son of Mr. Walton Turner, a currier, who sent him to Henry Wren and Co., of Manchester, to learn general engineering and millwrighting. When he was but little over twenty-two years of age he joined Mr. G. W. Hurwood in partnership at St. Peters Works, but the partnership lasted only a short time, and Mr. Hurwood retiring, Mr. Turner, after carrying the business on alone for a time, ultimately look into partnership his brother, Mr. Frederick Turner, and established the firm which now enjoys a wide reputation. The company was successful practically from the first, and the works were rapidly developed.

Mr. E. R. Turner took a particular interest in mills of all kinds for the crushing of cereals, and Was an active Competitor in the trials of the Royal and Smithfield shows..."[More].



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