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British Industrial History

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John Gwynne

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John Gwynne (1837-1912) of Gwynnes.

1837 Born, son of John Gwynne, Senior

1853 Joined his father’s engineering works in Essex Street as an apprentice[1].

1856 His father died

1861 Living at 19 Hanover Terrace, London with his widowed mother Agnes (age 54 and born in Scotland) and a Proprietor of Houses. In this family group are James E. Gwynne (age 28 and born in Ireland), a Civil Engineer; Mary A. Gwynne (age 24 and born in Ireland); John Gwynne (age 23 and born in Ireland), a Civil Engineer; Henry A. Gwynne (age 21 and born in Ireland), a Civil Engineer. Plus two servants and a visitor Margery Crawford. [2]

1867 In conjunction with his brother Henry, he founded the Hammersmith Iron Works for the manufacture of centrifugal pumping machinery, under the style of J. and H. Gwynne.

1871 Living at 19 Hanover Terrace, London with his widowed mother Agnes (age 62, born Glasgow). John was a mechanical engineer. Neither of his brothers was living in the house but his sister Mary, her husband and child were present.[3]

1881 Living at Kenton Grange, Harrow, aged 44, engineer, with his wife Agnes age 37 (born, Boston USA).[4].


1912 Obituary [5]

JOHN GWYNNE was born in Ireland on 14th January 1837.

He was educated at Bruce Castle and Esher, and entered his father's Essex Street Engineering Works as an apprentice in 1853.

In 1867, in conjunction with his brother Henry, he founded the Hammersmith Iron Works for the manufacture of centrifugal pumping machinery, the title of the firm being J. and H. Gwynne, and under this title they carried on business for thirty years.

In 1897 the concern was converted into a limited company, and six years later the ancient engineering works of Messrs. Gwynne and Co., Essex Street and Brooke Street, were united with the firm of J. and H. Gwynne, under the direction of Mr. John Gwynne, the present name of the firm, Gwynnes, Limited, being then adopted.

It continued actively to progress under his direction, and he personally carried out in various parts of the world many important and successful contracts for pumping plants, drainage and irrigation machinery, in conjunction with several of which he received a number of distinctions.

His death took place at his residence, Kenton Grange, near Harrow, Middlesex, on 2nd May 1912, at the age of seventy-five.

He became a Member of this Institution in 1870; he was also a Member of the Institution of Civil Engineers.


1912 Obituary [6]

JOHN GWYNNE, born in 1837, died at Kenton Grange, near Harrow, on the 2nd May, 1912.

Educated at Bruce Castle and Esher, he entered in 1863 his father’s engineering works in Essex Street, and 4 years later, in conjunction with his brother Henry, he founded the Hammersmith Iron Works for the manufacture of centrifugal pumping machinery, under the style of J. and H. Gwynne.

This business was in 1897 converted into a limited company, and in 1903 the works of Gwynne and Co, of Essex Street and Brooke Street, was united with it under the direction of Mr. John Gwynne, who carried out a large number of important pumping, dredging and other installations in various parts of the world.

He was a Member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, and was the recipient of several foreign decorations which he valued very highly.

Mr. Gwynne was elected a Member of The Institution on the 1st March, 1870.


1912 Obituary [7]

Text of obituary as ICE above


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