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Valentine Beardmore Stewart

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Valentine Beardmore Stewart (c1882-1933) of William Beardmore and Co

son of Duncan Stewart and nephew of William Beardmore


1933 Obituary [1]

Captain VALENTINE BEARDMORE STEWART, C.B.E., died suddenly in London on July 13, 1933; he was fifty-one years of age.

He served his apprenticeship as an engineer in his father's works, now known as Messrs. Duncan Stewart & Co., Ltd., London Road Ironworks, Glasgow.

He was then transferred to the Parkhead Forge of Messrs. William Beardmore & Co., Ltd., and in 1911 became works manager.

At the outbreak of war, he took up military service, and two years later was invalided home from Gallipoli. On his recovery he was appointed Controller of Gun Manufacture under the Ministry of Munitions, and was concerned with the acceleration of armament production.

In 1918 he was made an Officer of the British Empire, and two years later was awarded the C.B.E.

After the war he was engaged in an administrative capacity with Messrs. William Beardmore & Co., Ltd., and became a director; he relinquished this position in 1929.

He joined the Iron and Steel Institute in 1913; he became a Member of Council in 1924, but resigned his seat in February, 1932, as he was no longer actively associated with the steel industry. He was a nephew of Lord Invernairn of Strathnairn, Past-President of the Institute, and was well known in iron, steel and engineering circles in the West of Scotland.


* Obituary [2]

Engineers in Glasgow and London will learn with regret of the sudden death in London on Thursday, July 13th, of Mr. Valentine Beardmore Stewart, a former director of William Beardmore and Co., Ltd., and at one time a works manager at the firm's Parkhead Forge. Mr. Stewart, who was only fifty-one years of age, was a son of Mr. Duncan Stewart, of Glasgow, and a nephew of Lord Invernairn. After undergoing training at his father's works, he was transferred to Parkhead, and in 1911 became a works manager. At the outbreak of war he took up military service, and two years later he was invalided home from the Near East. On his recovery he was appointed Controller of Gun Manufacture under the Ministry of Munitions, and was concerned with the acceleration of armament production. In 1918 he was made an Officer of the British Empire, and two years later received the C.B.E. for his work as an industrialist . During the post-war period, Mr. Stewart served in an Administrative capacity with William Beardmore and Co., Ltd., and was a director of the company, until, in 1929, changes in management wer e made. During recent years he was prominent in his criticism of the present administration of the firm, and on Wednesday, July 12th, he spoke at its ordinary annual general meeting. He was, it would appear, not in very good health, but his sudden death the following morning came as a great surprise to his friends.




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